Advice from an Emerging Writer Having Success

26 January, 2020 § Leave a comment

A friend of mine was chuffed to get a guernsey in a UK writing mag. He had an article published about playing to your strengths.

Now, Greg provides great advice from his own experience and you can definitely benefit from that.

But think about the achievement of having an article you wrote being published on a broader stage and subtly promoting your writing and books.

Clever man, our Greg.

Always have a purpose in what you do, while writing for your audience.

Go read his article.

https://www.writers-online.co.uk/how-to-write/how-to-play-to-your-strengths-as-a-self-published-writer/

Work out what you can take away from it.

Note the strategy and emulate it when the time is right.

Image Greg Reed

What is Domestic Noir?

25 July, 2019 § Leave a comment

The literary world is complex. There are broad genres then sub-genres and even deeper categorisation beyond that.

Within the Crime genre, Domestic Noir occupies a peculiarly feminine place. It comprises crime that usually takes place within familiar places such as the home or workplace. It often concerns itself with the woman’s perspective. At it’s core, the topic of domestic noir centres around the concept that such domestic situations are inherently challenging and even dangerous, especially for women.

48% of crimes are domestic-related and women represent 70% of domestic murder victims.

Such statistics are perhaps sufficient to argue that a domestic noir sub-genre is redundant and may serve to minimise the contributions of many female authors.

By way of example, Paula Hawkins, Gillian Flynn and other female authors are considered writers of domestic noir. Male authors eg Harlen Corben, Lee Child, who write in a similar vein are not normally described as writing domestic noir books.

The domestic noir sub-genre was coined by Julia Crouch in 2013 so is relatively new in literary terms. It is perhaps too early to tell if it will become a category of fiction which will serve a long-term purpose.

 

[photo credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/writerscentrenorwich/31674011474%5D

Write Your Book and Sell It!

10 January, 2014 § Leave a comment

Highly recommend this practical program by an ex-teacher of Creative Writing, published author, NaNoWriMo winner who believes in publishing effectively and selling your written product.

If you want some ideas on how to be a better writer, lifehack has some clues … check them out.

Lost To The Craft Of Writing

7 January, 2014 § Leave a comment

But not their words which is one of their legacies. Perhaps that’s one of the reasons we write, to leave a little of us in the world after we move on.

This is a fitting tribute to just some of the more well known writers who passed away in 2013. We wrote about Doris Lessing’s passing but didn’t realise we’d lost some of these people.

Make your words count. They are left behind.

http://writersrelief.com/blog/2014/01/2013-memoriam/

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What Makes You Write?

10 December, 2013 § 4 Comments

Hard to believe, I know, but not everyone feels compelled to write.

Yeah. I don’t get that either. Still, each to their own.

For those who do have an insatiable and unstoppable urge to write, the question becomes … why?

I was fortunate enough to hear a few authors talking about their journey to being published and was fascinated to find that most differed in what caused them to become published.

One such person was Steve Bisley. Steve is a knockabout Aussie actor who was raised in a typical ordinary Australian family. As an actor he has enjoyed a modestly successful but consistent career in television and on stage. He admitted that as an actor, one is always interpreting the words and works of others. It got to the stage where he decided to have a bash and write his own story.

As often happens, his first novel was autobiographical in nature in the sense that it was a rollicking recollection of stories from his childhood. He admits to never having a diary or anything but his own memory as a keen observer of life. He recalled an image and wrote it out. Steve took time out from acting to write and set a discipline of writing in longhand daily from 8.30 am and then typing it into Word. If he didn’t follow that discipline he feared the book would ‘go on’ and never be finished.

He did indeed finish, was published, and is now writing his next book. Interestingly he thought writing was tough doing his first book. Now he realises that was easy because he just had to resell his life’s stories. In his new venture, he is finding it much harder as it’s not autobiographical at all.

Steve wrote to express himself in a new creative way rather than being a vehicle for others voices. He is learning a whole new way of being in his mature years and is stimulated as well as humbled by the whole process.

Here’s a quote I grabbed from his talk that I believe is so true.

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You Can Only Get Better as a Writer

3 December, 2013 § 2 Comments

You MUST Write to be a Writer

Believe It. If You Can Write, You’re a Writer!

3 December, 2013 § Leave a comment

Believe It. If You Can Write, You're a Writer!

Sometimes people need to embed the belief. Write it out 100 times … a day.

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