On Teaching Writing

9 May, 2021 § Leave a comment

It never ceases to amaze me … the diverse backgrounds and deep desire people have for learning to write.

I’ve met a wonderful people in my writing workshops over the years.

Here’s a sampling of some of their stories:

  • One has written a family history and has an idea for a story on a relative who was a convict.
  • Another would love to write children’s books with her daughter.
  • Alice is well into her 80’s and is being encouraged by her grandchildren to write down all the fantasy stories she has related to them.
  • Jack has been working on a rollicking good Aussie young adult adventure story.
  • Johann wrote an epic historical family memoir and needs to shape it up for publication.

Each of these is an ordinary person. They work, they have families, pastimes, and pressures. And they have either a burning desire or a persistent itch that drives them to write. Just as all successful and famous writers were and are ordinary.

Well, not all. I met Bryce Courteney many years ago before he became an author. At the time he was a copywriter and in his own fledgling business after being a big success in Advertising in a major firm. He went on to write commercial fiction, publishing annually just in time for Christmas sales. He learned a lot from his advertising career and made sure he wrote to meet the market. He was a unique individual, but he was a regular person.

There lies the magic!

To be a writer is within the reach of anyone.

Let me repeat that: to be a writer is within the reach of anyone. Including you!

All it needs is to find a story to tell. And the commitment to telling it.

Your past, your present, and your future each have nubs of ideas that can turn into a story.

Idea sparks surround you – in the news, advertisements, things that capture your attention, something you heard said, watching people at a cafe. The genesis of a story can be anywhere. It’s a matter of catching that seed, germinating and nurturing it, and watching it grow.

If it fails to thrive, put it aside and plant another story seed.

If you are a writer, you do more than say “one day”. You pick and prod at writing as time permits. You make time to write. You read and learn. You put ink to paper (even if indirectly through a keyboard). And you never let go of the dream of creating a work that gives you satisfaction and possibly appreciation from others.

In the words of Winston Churchill, “Never give up”.

Get Writing. Only You Can Write Your Words.

Life Writing

30 April, 2021 § Leave a comment

When someone is about to embark on a writing journey, they often do so because they want to document their memories, or those of someone close to them. Why? Either for posterity or to share a fascinating period of time or to distribute to family now and in the future to give a glimpse of the times they lived through.

In fact, life writing, or memoir, can be one of the best places to start your writing practice. You don’t need to worry about imagination, or being creative, or deciding what genre or style to write in … you simply write from memory. You write the life you know, have experienced and can talk reliably about. Who else is an expert on your life more than you?

If you are one of those organised people who has kept a diary for all or part of your life, your raw material is easily accessible! The rest of us have to rely on memory, and we know how unreliable that can be.

Writing about a period of your life can be entertaining, cathartic, difficult, humorous, and everything in between.

Personally, I avoided writing memoir pieces for two reasons. Firstly my memory is limited: a lot of my life is blank and I rely on photographs much of the time to recall certain things. For those times I don’t have a physical image, I have an emotional or mental image in mind. Secondly, it can be painful bringing back some memories and life events. They say not to dwell on the past but at some point we all revisit it to reminisce or remember.

If you’re intending to publish your memoir, then making it easy for the reader to engage in your story is paramount. In all writing, you need to find a way to let the reader into what’s in your mind that you are trying to share or replicate for them. How you do that is through traditional story-telling techniques.

In memoir, perhaps one of the best methods is to employ the ‘show, don’t tell’ approach.

When writing a piece, aim to recollect as much sensory detail as you can.

  • What season of the year was it? What time of day? Example, ” Wearing my shiny new black shoes, I skipped through the freshly fallen leaves that were all tones of yellow, brown and orange: I felt them crunch under my foot.” That gives you the sense this piece takes place around Autumn/Fall. Much better for the reader than saying, “it was autumn.”
  • Think about the feelings you had at the time and where you felt it in your body. “I knew I did wrong and my throat started to constrict, my tummy tightened and my chest felt like it would fall in on itself. I hid my hands behind my back: I knew I was in for the Principal’s cane.” That has more import for the reader than “I was scared going to the Principal’s office because I knew I’d get the cane.”
  • Which of your senses were involved? Was there a certain smell, aroma or scent? Were there noises around that were distinctive like “the rumble of an approaching locomotive”? Could you taste something? How about the physical feel of something, example, “the yellowing linen on Grandma’s table was crisp and standing to attention. I ran my hands over the tablecloth and it was smooth – so stiff I didn’t dare crinkle it.” Sounds, scents and tactile memories are keys to readers memories and imagination. You can use music to underline a period of time: “and I heard ‘Let It Be’ by the Beatles playing in the background” puts the memory around 1970 and will probably have your reader singing the words in their head.
  • In your memory piece, were other people involved? Who was there? What role did they play? How did you feel about those people? How did you feel about them being there? Alluding to them or describing them and the impact of the other people being there brings your reader in as well.
  • Did anything change, alter or shift during this period? Was it a pivotal moment in some way?

Memoir or life writing is more than the simple retelling of events. The more visceral you can make the experience, the more you can engage your reader to really make them feel as though they are in the moment with you/your character.

Use emotion, sensory cues and lots of showing (not telling) to bring this life-writing alive.

Make your reader want to turn the page to find out more.

memoir and life writing
Photos make wonderful memory prompts
This article was inspired by an online webinar presentation led by Dr Alison Daniell on the topic of Life Writing, held by Southampton University.
Photo credit: jarmoluk @ Pixabay https://pixabay.com/photos/photos-hands-hold-old-256887/

Entering Writing Competitions

26 April, 2021 § Leave a comment

Why enter a writing competition?

Entering a writing competition forces you to write. It gives you a deadline and, hopefully, a topic or theme. And an impending deadline sure helps to focus the mind! Procrastination thieves are everywhere – if you’re like a lot of writers or aspiring writers then you might be inclined to put things off – you’ll write after … the washing is done, the shopping is done, you polish the car … you get the idea. A whole lot of perfunctory activities suddenly come into into prominence when you know you need to sit down to a blank page.

One of the big reasons people often enter writing competitions is the chance to compare your idea of how well you write to how others receive your writing. If your work gets through to the finalist round or you win a prize then that is confirmation of you as a writer. Don’t dismiss the size of competition or how many words you wrote – you made a mark and the judges chose what you wrote. Give yourself a pat on the back, bask in the glow of achievement and set your sights on writing the next entry.

How to win a writing competition?

Well, obviously, if there were a formula we’d all be winning and there’d really be non competition!

Surprisingly though, a lot of writers knock themselves out of contention before they even get to be read.

1. Firstly, you have to enter to win. Sounds simple enough but how many times have you printed out the entry form with the Terms and Conditions and lost them in the detritus of daily living, only to find them when the deadline has passed? Oh. It’s just me then? Or, you talk yourself out of actually writing by listening to that Negative Nancy in your noggin – tell her to take a hike until you’re done writing. Set up a ‘Competiton’ folder both on your computer and your desk to keep details of competitions in so you don’t lose them. I put them in deadline-date order.

2. Once you have the deadline date, the next thing to do is to pencil that in your diary – even if you’re just thinking about it. (If you are a Master Procrastinator, put the date a couple of weeks earlier!).

3. When you decide which comp to enter, use that end-date as the starting point to writing: calculate how many days/weeks you have along with the number of words required – schedule your writing time for that entry. Set your end date at least a week ahead so you have time to review and revise before submitting.

4. Before you start writing, read the Terms and Conditions, thoroughly. Especially note the open/close dates, word count limit, any theme, the purpose or reason for the competition that might give clues on what material is expected), format requirements, submission method eg online, email or by post. Research the organiser – that might inform you about their expectations or preferences with might give you an edge.

5. Word counts noted are usually fixed as a maximum, not suggested. Do not go over them and don’t go too far under them. If the entry states 1000 words and you send in 1001 … you’ll be thrown in the slush pile without a look-in. Note, word count often excludes Title, but check! Conversely, if you send in 250 words for a 1000 word comp, you’ll also be out. Match your entry close to the required word count but never over it.

6. Formatting is critical to follow – again, another opportunity to be eliminated. If the entry form asks for Courier 12pt single spaced and you send in 10pt Marker Felt double spaced, you’re upping the likelihood of being disqualified.

Following the Terms and Conditions of an entry is the first challenge in winning. Organisers review each entry at the beginning and cull those that don’t meet terms. In the ‘first round’ they’ll ask questions such as – has the entry submitted on time? is the layout as requested? Is the word count at or close to what’s been asked? Has the entry fee, if any, been paid? Have other conditions been met eg eligibility, theme etc? These administration actions take place up front, before your entry even has a chance of being submitted to judges.

You’d be surprised how many entries are disqualified at the first hurdle.

“But I wrote a really great story!”

Bad luck.

Adhere to the requirements – they are there for a reason. If you’re not sure about anything ask the organisers or see if their website has a set of FAQs that might help. Keep in mind that organisers get hundreds if not thousands of entries and it’s not possible to respond individually.

With the technicalities out of the way, let’s look at writing your piece.

Consider what the organisers are looking for in any entry. Then, muse how the typical writer might respond … and brainstorm alternate approaches that are a little different. Twists, quirks and unexpected entries stand out from the pack – that can be a good thing if you are on target with your entry in all other respects.

For fiction, focus on your storyline, keep your point of view consistent, along with your style and tone.

Keep the reader engaged with pace and some tension.

Do some research where necessary to make your entry as good as possible.

Write your piece as best you can. Then put it aside for a while. Go play with something else then revisit your writing entry and see if you can revise it and improve it.

Remember to edit and proofread before hitting ‘ submit’. Give yourself every opportunity to put in your best entry.

Sad to say, there are no magic methods to winning a writing competition. You need to write a good story that fits the brief and meets requirements. The number of people who fail to give themselves a fair chance by not meeting requirements, or not even submitting is surprising! Don’t be that person.

Want a handy reference to what’s in this article? I created an informative infographic to keep on your bulletin board to remind you of the key points in entering a writing competition. Grab it below.

Get Inspiration For Your Writing

13 March, 2021 § Leave a comment

At 6.30 am this morning I woke to be ready to join in and listen to Women’s Voices, Telling Stories, storytelling evening hosted by Liz Weir. (It was evening in Northern Ireland!)

What a feast that was. I’m only sad that I had to leave early after an hour and a half. So many women weaved words of magic to spell-bind the listener. It was like times past where you’d sit around the campfire or hearth and listen to stories being told. Before the days of wireless and television and social media apps. A time when people focused on people and mesmerised children and adults with tales well spun.

It was a delightful hour and a half for me. I was enchanted, engaged and energised with creativity. I took notes of passages and phrases that stood out like “skin shimmering like white pearl” from Masako Carey, and many more.

Listening to storytellers is not something I’d normally do. It was an opportunity that presented itself and I grabbed the opportunity. I don’t plan to be a storyteller. But something told me it would be worthwhile times spent – and it was.

So, switch up how you take in information, what you consume, where you normally look for inspiration.

Doing different things accesses different regions of the brain and perks up your creative space. It shakes things up. Our brains are inherently lazy. Actually they’re highly efficient. They are designed to make sense of our world and then repeat the same process. Every now and then we benefit from changing our usual patterns, Like taking a different route home – you suddenly see things you’d not noticed for some time such as a tree in bloom or shedding its autumnal leaves. You’re alert to your surroundings because they are not overly familiar.

When you alter what comes into your vision and hearing, like listening to storytellers, you reconstruct temporarily your brain pattern. I feel inspired and creative and ready to write with new ideas after that session. I wouldn’t have felt that this morning if I’d followed my usual morning routine.

How can you shake up today or tomorrow to access some creativity and inspire your writing?

Lessons From Joanne Rowling

5 December, 2020 § Leave a comment

Like many writers and aspiring authors, the story of J.K. Rowling is a real rags-to-riches tale with so many lessons to learn. From her penniless start, her determination by writing in a local café, her complex plots and characters, her perseverance in the face of rejection and her capacity to turn her series into other products and merchandise making her the richest author to date.

Our chances of emulating her success is questionable but our ability to improve our mindset and craft is definitely possible.

Today I discovered a website dedicated to just that: learning from the lessons of Rowling. Grab a bevvie, find a comfy chair, hold your fave pen over your ever-present notebook and begin …

https://writelikerowling.wordpress.com/

Lessons from J K Rowling

Researching Family History and More

1 December, 2020 § Leave a comment

One of the first experiences with writing is generated by a desire to put together a family history or a memoir. I just came across this resource and thought I’d pop it in here so I don’t lose it – and can access it when I get around to doing my own family history!

Hopefully, these materials will stay around for a while, but if not, I’m sure a local library will be able to help.

https://www.nla.gov.au/content/past-webinar-recordings

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

How to Edit Your Own Book

17 November, 2020 § Leave a comment

When you write those two most satisfying words “The End”, it is a bittersweet moment. Getting to that point could represent a couple of days if you’re Stephen King or over a year’s worth of sweating out characters and plots to finish your novel. But the savvy writer knows that moment of celebration is the forerunner to lots more hard work: the revising and editing process where you put your words through a fine sieve to reveal the gems and wash out the mud. It’s a tough task if you’re in love with your word magic. No one wants to sacrifice their babies, but the reader wants you to do that so you create not just a well-written book but a well-read one.

A very useful presentation on what to keep in mind when revising and editing your own novel or non-fiction piece is on video with a series of authors and editors offering expert tips and ideas and how to make the process easier and more productive for you.

Key points …

  • be willing to cut anything to strengthen the story
  • read your dialogue out loud
  • use action verbs to drive the story
  • avoid passive writing
  • watch “I felt like” and convert it into descriptive (show v tell)
  • ensure all paragraphs and scenes are in sequence
  • make sure characters are consistent throughout
  • once you finish your first draft, put it aside for a while
  • read other people’s books and flag ideas/phrases/descriptions that impact you and learn how the writer raised your emotion
  • go back to your book and flag what’s worked well in your story
  • look for content issues first
  • review style, voice and scene issues and note what to improve/cut
  • revisit the third time and go over punctuation, structure, complicated sentences etc
  • now go back and revise using your flags and notes
  • consider copy-editing as you go eg read what wrote day before and notice simple errors
  • wait until the end for structural editing – much easier to edit something that’s finished
  • tools for editing depends on the type of edit
    • spell check
    • grammar check – automated and manual – look for obvious issues like that/which
    • recognise the limitations of any tool you use
  • beware of overusing adverbs (eg very, really etc)
  • make sure the character’s voices are distinctive
  • get someone else to help critique to pick up any misses from reading and reviewing your own work

Those are just my summary notes – watch the video for more detail, especially the first 2-3 sessions.

Write – revise – edit – rewrite – revise – edit – rewrite – revise edit … until you’ve polished the best book you can produce. Of course, if you snag a traditional publishing contract then some of the work will be done for you, the than the writing. If you self publish, the more you revise and edit, the better your readers experience will be. A professional editor is valuable if you can spring the money for it: if not, do the work.

Bloody Scotland – Brilliant Crime Festival

1 October, 2020 § Leave a comment

I discovered Bloody Scotland by accident, and I’m glad I did.

It’s a bloody wonderful festival chock-full of crime writers including luminaries such as Val McDermid, Lee Child and more. There’s nothing wee abood it!

If you want to get your fill of intense input on writing and reading crime – tap into the minds of these generous soles.

You can watch replays of the virtual sessions on their YouTube Channel. Here is the excellent opener and there is a full playlist of talks available.

WARNING – these vids are only live until the end of October 2020.

Get to it!

And then start planning your trip to Scotland for 2021’s festival … Covid-19 permitting!

Audio Fiction – the next big thing

15 March, 2020 § Leave a comment

Radio drama series were a welcome form of entertainment before television took precedence in homes.

We’ve had blockbuster T.V series and movies. Visual entertainment continued but as with many things, evolution keeps changing the landscape.

More recently audiobooks and podcasts have surged in popularity, especially for those on long commutes.

The circle turns and the new kid on the block is audio fiction and it’s already capturing attention and funding from big names.

Not quite radio drama, audio fiction is not dissimilar. Plays produced and transmitted without visuals.

Read more about here …

https://apple.news/Akf3GeASsQ3-F1HGTgSb9TQ

Advice from an Emerging Writer Having Success

26 January, 2020 § Leave a comment

A friend of mine was chuffed to get a guernsey in a UK writing mag. He had an article published about playing to your strengths.

Now, Greg provides great advice from his own experience and you can definitely benefit from that.

But think about the achievement of having an article you wrote being published on a broader stage and subtly promoting your writing and books.

Clever man, our Greg.

Always have a purpose in what you do, while writing for your audience.

Go read his article.

https://www.writers-online.co.uk/how-to-write/how-to-play-to-your-strengths-as-a-self-published-writer/

Work out what you can take away from it.

Note the strategy and emulate it when the time is right.

Image Greg Reed